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WINTER WHITE SALE!

CUSTOM BLEACH TRAYS WITH WHITENING GEL

ON SALE THROUGH MARCH 28TH

NOW ONLY $200

REGULAR PRICE $250 (A SAVINGS OF $50)

PLEASE CONTACT OUR OFFICE TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT

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LOW DENTAL OFFICE PRICE!

ORAL B GENIUS ELECTRIC TOOTHBRUSH

$20 MAIL-IN REBATE

$100 IS YOUR FINAL COST AFTER REBATE

 
8805 Columbia 100 Pkwy, Suite 104
Columbia, MD 21045
410-730-2337
www.columbia100dental.com

The best way to protect your children's teeth is to teach them good dental habits.  With proper coaching your children will quickly adopt good oral hygiene as a part of their daily routine.

As soon as your child has a tooth you should start helping your child brush 2 times a day with a smear (size of a grain of rice) of fluoride toothpaste on a child-sized toothbrush that has soft bristles. You'll need to supervise and help them brush to remove all the plaque -- the soft, sticky, bacteria-containing deposits that accumulate on the teeth that cause tooth decay.  Also, keep an eye out for areas of brown or white spots which might be signs of early decay.

At age 3 you can start using a pea-size amount of fluoride toothpaste. Once your children are able to tie their shoes, they should have adequate coordination to brush their teeth as well.  However, because of problems that can arise from unbalanced development of permanent and primary teeth, they may still need help with flossing.

The ADA recommends that children see a dentist by their first birthday and every 6 months thereafter.  At this first visit, the dentist will explain proper brushing and flossing techniques and do an exam while your baby sits on your lap.  These first visits can help find any problems early and help kids get accustomed to visiting the dentist.  At subsequent dental visits your children will see a hygienist who will clean their teeth and apply a fluoride varnish treatment to help protect tooth enamel and prevent decay.

In addition to toothbrushing and regular visits to a dentist, your children's diet plays a key role in dental health.  Keep in mind the longer and more frequently teeth are exposed to sugar, the great the risk of cavities.  Sticky, sugary foods such as caramel, gummy candy and dried fruit -- particularly when it stays in the mouth and bathes teeth in sugar for hours -- can lead to tooth decay.  Also, if your child drinks sodas and/or fruit juices frequently, their teeth are exposed to the acid in these sugary beverages which can also lead to tooth decay.  Drinking water after consuming sugary treats or drinks and limiting the duration it stays in a child's mouth will help prevent dental problems.

Keep in mind that good dental habits start early and explain to your children why it is so important to take good care of their teeth.  After all, we want them to have a healthy smiles for a lifetime!

We hope you found this newsletter informative. If you have any questions about any of the material covered in this issue, please don't hesitate to call us at 410-730-2337.

We look forward to seeing you soon!

The entire team at Columbia 100 Dental

www.columbia100dental.com
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