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REGULAR PRICE $250

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PLEASE CONTACT OUR OFFICE TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT

 
8805 Columbia 100 Pkwy, Suite 104
Columbia, MD 21045
410-730-2337
www.columbia100dental.com

Is a taste of ice cream or a sip of hot coffee sometimes a painful experience for you?  Does brushing or flossing make you wince occasionally?  If so, you may have a common problem called sensitive teeth.

Cavities and fractured teeth can cause sensitive teeth.  But if your dentist has ruled these problems out, then worn tooth enamel, a cracked tooth or an exposed tooth root may be the cause.

A layer of enamel, the strongest substance in the body, protects the crowns of healthy teeth.  A layer called cementum protects the tooth root under the gum line.  Underneath the enamel and the cementum is dentin, a part of the tooth that is less dense than enamel or cementum.

The dentin contains microscopic tubules, which are small hollow tubes or canals.  When the dentin loses its protective covering, the tubules allow heat and cold or acidic or sticky foods to stimulate the nerves and cells inside the tooth.  This causes hypersensitivity and occasional discomfort.  Fortunately, the irritation does not cause permanent damage to the pulp.  Dentin may be exposed when gums recede.  The result can be hypersensitivity near the gum line.

Proper oral hygiene is the key to preventing gums from receding and causing sensitive-tooth pain.  If you brush your teeth incorrectly or even over-brush, gum problems can result.  Ask your dentist or hygienist if you have any questions about your daily oral hygiene routine.

Sensitive teeth can be treated.  Your dentist and hygienist may suggest that you try a desensitizing toothpaste such as Clinpro Tooth Creme which we sell for $10.00 per tube or Sensodyne.  These special toothpastes contain compounds that help block transmission of sensation from the tooth surface to the nerve.  Desensitizing toothpaste usually requires several applications before the sensitivity is reduced.

Your dentist and hygienist may also recommend in-office application of a fluoride varnish that strengthens tooth enamel and reduces the transmission of sensations.  Many dental insurance companies do not cover this procedure and if you are interested in having this done at your next hygiene visit, our fee is $25.00.

We hope you found this newsletter informative. If you have any questions about any of the material covered in this issue, please don't hesitate to call us at 410-730-2337.

We look forward to seeing you soon!

The entire team at Columbia 100 Dental

www.columbia100dental.com
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